Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979)

Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 1)

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Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 1)

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[page 1]

[corresponds to front cover of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

welcome

to........

delaware

ohio

[photo from Little Brown Jug race]
Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 2)

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Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 2)

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[page 2]

[corresponds to inside of front cover of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

The Delaware Area Chamber of

Commerce invites you to visit

or write our office at 27 West

Winter Street, or call (614)

369-6221, if you have any questions

or need for additional information.

The Chamber of Commerce is

here to serve the community

and its residents and to make

visitors welcome.

[aerial photograph of Delaware]
Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 3)

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Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 3)

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[page 3]

[corresponds to page inlet between pages 2 and 3 in Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

table

of

contents

Welcome to Delaware 1

Our Heritage 2

Community Services 4

Medical Services 6

Religious Life 7

Housing 8

Education 10

Special Events 12

Recreation 14

Industry 16

Agriculture 18

Research 19

Shopping 20

Motels and Restaurants 21

Climate 22

Sponsors 23
Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 4)

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Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 4)

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[page 4]

[corresponds to page 1 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

welcome

to

delaware

Delaware is growing fast, but like

a fine racing standardbred, it is

keeping its head as it quickens

the pace.

At 20,000, the city's population is

already ahead of projections from the

early '70's. A recent study predicts

26,000 residents within the next

eight to ten years. The Ohio Depart-

ment of Economic and Community

Development has predicted a

population boom of 63.2 percent

for the county by the year 2000, one

of the fastest projected growth

rates in the state.

Delaware still offers the best of

both worlds . . . quiet tree-lined

streets and friendly faces and modern

services of a small city and the

convenience of a major city,

Columbus, only thirty minutes away.

Citizens and public officials are

working to keep the features that

have made Delaware attractive to its

long-time residents. Hundred-year-old

homes find appreciative owners and

diligent restorers, but new homes

and apartment complexes are also

springing up in many sections of town.

Consultants have been retained to

guide the city in the development

of new residential areas and

expanding services.

Several features make Delaware

unique: its central location with

accessibility to major highways,

the cultural enrichment afforded by

Ohio Wesleyan University and the

excitement of Grand Circuit

Harness Racing in the Little Brown

Jug, one of the sport's biggest

events.

Delaware is also in a growing

recreation area, with water sports

available on nearby rivers and at the

four reservoir watershed lakes in

the county.

There's a strong sense of history

in Delaware, which traces its

beginnings to the opening of the

Northwest Territory and claims

among its native sons the United

States' nineteenth president,

Rutherford B. Hayes. But there is

also a strong belief in the future.

We hope this book will bring you to

believe in Delaware as we do.

The Delaware Area

Chamber of Commerce

1
Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 5)

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[page 5]

[corresponds to page 2 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

our

heritage

In 1801 the first pioneers settled

in an area which was still occupied

by the Delaware Indians. Maps from

the middle of the 18th Century

show that Mingoes and other tribes

had pre-Revolutionary settlements

along a trail from the lower Scioto

Valley northward to the Sandusky

Bay area. Hundreds of years

earlier, the Mound Builders inhabited

this area leaving behind several

mounds in Delaware County.

Delaware County was formed in

a division of Franklin County in

1808, the same year the city of

Delaware was founded. Immediately

the county seat, Delaware was

seriously considered for the

state capital before Columbus was

selected.

During the War of 1812, Delaware

served as headquarters for

General William Henry Harrison.

A few of Harrison's soldiers are

buried in area cemeteries. With

the Treaty of Greenville in 1814,

Indians left the area and settlers

poured in.

Among these settlers were the

parents of Rutherford B. Hayes.

Born in Delaware in 1822, Hayes served

as a general in the Civil War,

governor of Ohio, and nineteenth

president of the United States.

Hayes met his wife, Lucy Webb

Hayes, when she came to Delaware

as a special student at Ohio

Wesleyan University in the days

before it was officially

coeducational.

Ohio Wesleyan University was

founded in 1842. Its first building

was the Mansion House, a health

resort built near a medicinal

springs in 1833. The resort,

billed as the "Saratoga of the

West", failed after the Panic

of 1837 and was purchased by

Methodists seeking to establish

a liberal arts college. The Mansion

House, now called Elliott Hall,

is still in use at Ohio Wesleyan

and is one of three campus buildings

listed in the National Registry.

Delaware County's rugged terrain

and the predominantly northern

2
Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 6)

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Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 6)

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[page 6]

[corresponds to page 3 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

sympathies of its settlers brought

the pre-Civil War underground

railway through the area. Africa

Road in eastern Delaware County

owes its name to this era.

Delaware's present challenges are

less dramatic than Indian unrest

and abolitionism, but no less

important. The local government

and citizenry work closely to meet

these challenges.

[photos of downtown Delaware]

3
Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 7)

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Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 7)

Description

[page 7]

[corresponds to page 4 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

community

services

Delaware's city government is a

council-manager system with seven

members serving four-year

overlapping terms. They work with

an annual budget in excess of

$3 million, drawn mostly from

the city's modest income tax and

3 mill portion of the overall

39 mills per dollar valuation real

estate tax.

Delaware County government is

headed by a three-member Board

of Commissioners serving four-year

terms, assisted by a full-time County

Administrator. The county's $4.6

million budget includes $1.5

million for construction and

maintenance of an extensive county

road system totaling nearly 500

miles. General Fund revenues are

derived from a 2.9 mill real

estate tax, fees for various services

performed and the 1/2 of 1 per

cent permissive sales tax.

Diversified industry, agriculture,

and retail and service establishments

provide a wide range of job

opportunities in Delaware County.

The local level of unemployment

is consistently among the lowest

in the nation.

The city's water and sewage system

has recently been expanded to

meet growing needs. The Delaware

Reservoir will provide the city

with an adequate water supply well

into the future. A county water

system already exists and a

countywide sewer system for the

southern part of the county is

under construction.

Delaware's access to major

highways is one of its greatest

assets. Four-lane US 23 South

makes a half-hour commute for the

many Delaware residents who

work in northern Columbus;

US 36 and 37 provide four-lane

access to Interstate 71. Delaware's

location midway between Cleveland

and Cincinnati (each is

approximately 140 miles away) and

its proximity to Columbus have

made it a convenient choice as

home for sales representatives.

Delaware County is rated territory

39, which allows residents the most

reasonable automobile insurance

rate in Ohio.

The City of Delaware has a Class

4 fire rating by the Ohio Rating

Bureau, recognizing the protection

of all areas of the city by a well-

trained, well-equipped fire depart-

ment. The department also carries

on an extensive fire training pro-

gram in all industrial plants in the

city as well as safety programs

in the schools.

[photos of Delaware buildings]

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Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 8)

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[page 8]

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Community leaders and organizations

work hard to keep all services --

security, medical, welfare,

transportation and education --

first-rate and up-to-date.

In Delaware County 38 volunteer

and governmental agencies offer

a variety of health and welfare

services to all citizens. The Unit-

ed Way provides partial or total

funding for these 14 agencies:

Alcohol Council, American Red

Cross, Boy Scouts, Council for

Retarded Citizens, Dental Fund,

Girl Scouts, Help Anonymous,

Homemaker Home Health Aide

Services, Liberty Community

Center and Liberty Community

Children's Center, Mental Health

Association, Salvation Army,

Senior Citizens, Speech and

Hearing Center, and United Way

Community Services.

Because Delaware County responds

generously to Red Cross blood

drives, credit for blood is

available to the immediate families

of Delaware County residents

anywhere in the U.S. or Canada.

In this and many other ways the

Red Cross helps more than 9000

city and county residents each year.

The Salvation Army Camp at

Greenwood Lake on the northern

edge of town offers a summer camp

program reaching more than 1,000

low-income children in central

Ohio. Among other local service

agencies are the Cancer Society

and Heart Fund; both are very

active in the city and on the

Ohio Wesleyan campus.

Many national and international

service, community and patriotic

organizations are active in

Delaware, including Kiwanis,

Rotary, Lions, Jaycees, Sertoma,

Altrusa, National Association of

Secretaries, American Association

of University Women, League of

Women Voters and Business and

Professional Women, to name

just a few. Veterans' groups include

the American Legion, Veterans of

Foreign Wars, Amvets, Veterans

of WWI and their auxiliaries.

The DAR, Colonial Dames and

the Daughters of Union Veterans

also have local clubs. A listing

of all civic, social and service

clubs in the county is available

in the United Way Office.

The services of the Delaware

County District Library

extend far beyond its downtown

building housing 61,000 volumes.

Young children learn to enjoy

books through weekly story hours

and the Bookmobile covers almost

4,000 county miles each year

serving outlying areas. The

Library's collection includes more

than 100 magazine subscriptions,

records, films and items of

local history and genealogy.

Providing newspaper coverage

of Delaware and the surrounding

area is the Delaware Gazette,

founded in 1818 and published

daily since 1884, and the Sunbury

News. Citizens also can receive

home delivery of the Columbus

and Cleveland papers, and other

major city papers are available

through newsstands. Local radio

stations are WDLR and during

the school year, Ohio Wesleyan's

station, WSLN. All Columbus

metropolitan radio stations, three

network television stations and

one UHF station, Ohio State's

WOSU, offer excellent reception.

Cable television is available in

the city for a small charge.

[photo: "POLICE DEPARTMENT"]

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Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 9)

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Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 9)

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[page 9]

[corresponds to page 6 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

medical

services

Delaware has unusually fine

medical services and facilities

for a city of its size. Grady

Memorial Hospital, a non-profit,

short term, general medical/surgical

facility, is accredited by the

Joint Commission on Accreditation

of Hospitals and is a member in

good standing of the American

Hospital Association and the

Ohio Hospital Association.

Grady has 130 beds and provides

medical, surgical, pediatric, full

maternity, coronary and emergency

care. An addition was completed

in 1976 with emphasis on

ancillary services and outpatient

care. Typical ancillary services

are laboratory, x-ray, physical

therapy, operating room, cardio-

pulmonary, chemotherapy room, EKG,

EEG, recovery room, pharmacy and

outpatient clinics.

There are 28 active physicians;

23 consulting physicians, both

generalists and specialists, and

14 dentists in practice in the

area. Other specialists maintain

special weekly hours in Delaware.

Way House, a tri-county medical

health center, offers outpatient

psychological and psychiatric care.

Ten additional health facilities,

including the hospitals associated

with the Ohio State University

Schools of Medicine, are located

within a 30 mile radius. Paramedics

from the Delaware City Fire

Department and the county

emergency medical service provide

emergency treatment and ambulance

service.

[photo of Grady Memorial Hospital in background]

6
Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 10)

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Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 10)

Description

[page 10]

[corresponds to page 7 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

religious

life

More than 70 churches offer

opportunities for worship and

service to members of almost all

Protestant denominations, and at

St. Mary's Catholic Church,

elementary and middle school classes

as well. The Delaware Christian

School operates from the Delaware

Bible Church. There are Jewish

synagogues in Columbus and Marion

and a Unitarian church in northern

Columbus.

Many Delaware churches trace

their origins to the town's

earliest years. First Presbyterian

Church, organized in 1810, and

St. Peter's Episcopal, 1817, the

city's two oldest, continue to

meet in buildings that date from

the mid-1800s. Just a block away,

William Street United Methodist

Church, which began in 1818,

occupies its fourth sanctuary, a

new building completed in 1973.

An active county ministerial alliance

and Church Women United carry

out community service programs

that extend across denominational

lines. All of Delaware's churches

have vigorous youth organizations.

[photos of churches]

7
Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 11)

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Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 11)

Description

[page 11]

[corresponds to page 8 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

housing

Many Delaware families are

"living in the past" . . . in

century-old homes they have restored.

In addition to its beautiful,

older homes, Delaware also has

many newer residential areas

in all sections of the city

and county. Real estate has

maintained its market value over

the years as pride of ownership in

the area is great. Homes range

from $35,000 to over $100,000

depending on location and condition.

Apartments in Delaware are

abundant and varied. There are

many newer apartment units and

twin singles and some older, large

homes converted into apartments

with rentals varying from $125

to $300 per month depending on

size, location, facilities and

other factors. Single family homes

for rent are difficult but not

impossible to find.

Condominium units, from $25,000

to $40,000, represent care-free

living as far as exterior maintenance

is concerned. Two local condominium

areas offer swimming pools and

tennis courts.

Homes, apartments and

condominiums are almost always

in the planning stages in the

area.

[photo of house]

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Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 12)

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[page 12]

[corresponds to unlabeled page 9 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

[photo of people talking outside of a house]
Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 13)

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Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 13)

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[page 13]

[corresponds to page 10 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

education

Educational opportunities in Delaware

County area run the full range

from pre-kindergarten through

graduate school: city and county

public schools, a parochial

school, a vocational school, a

school for retarded children,

a sheltered workshop for retarded

adults, Ohio Wesleyan University

and The Methodist Theological

School in Ohio.

The Delaware city schools, serving

about 3800 pupils, rank in the

top one-fourth in Ohio in enrollment

and in the upper half in per pupil

wealth. The school tax is just

above the state median and includes

a building levy which permits the

system to make additions to

building and improve older

facilities without additional

indebtedness. The last bond issue,

in 1960 to finance Rutherford B.

Hayes High School, will be paid

by 1980.

A four-quarter curriculum at the

high school level, initiated in

1972 as the "Delaware Plan", is

drawing national attention. It is

designed around four 45-day terms

and an optional summer term.

The ACT scores of Hayes college-

bound graduates have consistently

been two full points above the

national averages. At the middle

school level (grades 6 to 8) team

teaching, with "executive teachers"

assisted by teacher interns, has

been in effect for several years.

Many entering children take

advantage of the six-week pre-

kindergarten summer program,

operated without tuition on

local funding.

Delaware, among the first school

systems in the state to offer a

full program for the mentally

impaired, also provides special

classes for the neurologically

handicapped. Deaf, blind, and crippled

children attend special classes

in Columbus at the expense of the

Delaware City Board of Education.

An enrichment program is

available for specially gifted

and talented pupils.

The Delaware school system is

staffed by 204 professional

persons, more than half with ten

years or more of experience, and

more than 30 percent with master's

degrees. About half of Delaware's

high school graduates go on to

college.

St. Mary's School, adjoining the

Catholic church in downtown

Delaware, serves 300 pupils from

the city and county. It offers

grades one through eight with a

faculty of 12, including a full-

time reading specialist.

[photo of man reading under a tree]

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Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 14)

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Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 14)

Description

[page 14]

[corresponds to page 11 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

Surrounding the Delaware school

district is the three-district

area served by the county schools:

Buckeye Valley (north and west),

Big Walnut (southeast) and

Olentangy (south). Included in

these districts are three high,

two middle and eight elementary

schools with a combined faculty of

324. Each district is administered

by its own Board of Education.

In 1974 the City and County

Boards established a Joint

Vocational School. Offerings now

include agriculture, business office

education, distributive education,

home economics, health care and

trade and industrial education

include auto mechanics and

cosmetology. The JVS serves not

only high school age students, but

also offers many courses to

adults, as well. Adult courses are

designed to meet specific and

immediate employment needs.

Industries are urged to contact the

JVS to establish such cooperative

programs.

Ohio Wesleyan is a liberal arts

college with an enrollment of

2200 students and a faculty of

over 160. The University employs

500 persons with a payroll of

more than $5.5 million, most of

which goes directly into the

Delaware area economy. In addition,

the University spends nearly

$1 million annually for utilities.

The new Ohio Wesleyan Riverside

School of Nursing has upperclass

students taking clinical work

at various area hospitals including

Grady Memorial Hospital in

Delaware.

Many of the facilities on the

University's 200-acre campus

are open to use by townspeople.

The 340,000-volume Beeghly

Library, for example, is one of

the finest college collections in

the country. The University's large

outdoor tennis facility is also

open to the public when classes

or meets are not being held. Ohio

Wesleyan's faculty and students

are active participants in community

programs from ecological studies

to blood donation drives.

Hundreds of its alumni return to

the campus each year for

reunions and special events and

many have chosen Delaware for their

retirement homes.

A comparative newcomer to

Delaware, The Methodist Theological

School began classes in 1960.

Its beautiful 69-acre campus

is in the rolling, wooded countryside

just south of town. Approximately

250 students attend the seminary.

A faculty of 26 directs the

studies leading to Master of

Divinity, M.A. in religious education,

and (in cooperation with other

seminaries and universities),

the Doctor of Ministry degrees.

Other universities and colleges

within a 30-mile radius of

Delaware are: Capital University,

Franklin University, Ohio Dominican

College, Ohio State University,

Ohio State University-Marion

Campus, Marion Technical College,

Otterbein College, and

Pontifical College Josephinum.

Business and technical colleges

in Columbus include Bliss

College, Columbus Business

University, Columbus College of

Art and Design, Columbus Drafting

College and Columbus Technical

Institute.

[photo of graduates]

11
Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 15)

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Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 15)

Description

[page 15]

[corresponds to page 12 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

special

events

Horse races and chamber orchestras,

Broadway musicals and marching

bands, country fairs and

foreign movies . . . all are

a part of the Delaware scene.

Racing fever soars each September

with the opening of the

Delaware County Fair, the only

county fair in the world to

offer Grand Circuit Harness

Racing. The one-half mile dirt

track on the fairgrounds was

designed by a local long-time

resident, R.K. McNamara, and is

among the fastest in the country.

New records are set each year. The

highlight of the four days of

racing is the running of the

Little Brown Jug, one of the

nation's top three harness

races with a purse of $150,000.

Named for an outstanding pacer

of an earlier day, the "Jug"

regulary draws crowds of more

than 40,000 from all over the

United States and Canada.

An annual August attraction is

the Ohio State Fair, one of the

nation's biggest. Each year

outstanding performers and

exhibitors take part in shows that

bring thousands of visitors to

the fairgrounds just off Interstate

71 in northern Columbus.

Throughout the year its buildings

host antique shows, flower shows,

automobile displays, ethnic

celebrations such as Oktoberfest

and professional craft shows like

Winterfare.

Each spring Delaware holds its

own crafts show, the Delaware

Arts Fair. Craftsmen come from all

over the state to display their

work before appreciative crowds

lining Sandusky and Winter

Streets.

For those who love classical music,

Ohio Wesleyan's Lecture-Artist

Series brings noted concert-

artists to Gray Chapel Auditorium

each year. In addition, there

are numerous recitals and concerts

by local musicians, many with

no admission fee. For fans of

contemporary music, the OWU

major attractions brings at least

three big name shows to Delaware

each year. Newsworthy public

figures also appear in Delaware

as a part of the Lecture-Artist

Series and other special events

on campus.

Theatre buffs may see productions

ranging from Shakespeare to

the avant garde at Ohio Wesleyan's

new Chappelear Drama Center

on its proscenium and arena

stages. In recent summers, a

town and gown season for family

entertainment has been produced

with townspeople of all ages

in the casts.

Area high schools have excellent

music and theatre programs.

Marching bands, choirs and large-

cast musicals draw capacity

crowds throughout the year in

Delaware, high school students

have formed a company called

Sneaker Theatre which produces

plays for children.

Columbus, of course, schedules

symphony concerts, Broadway

touring companies and virtually

all contemporary musical performers

on national tour. The Cincinnati

and Cleveland Orchestras and the

Blossom Center Summer Festival

(for music and ballet) are only

two hours away. Each summer the

Kenley Players present nationally-

known artists in musical productions

at Columbus' Veterans Memorial

Auditorium. Other colleges theatre

and musical productions are

close by at Ohio State, Otterbein

and Denison Universities.

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Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 16)

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Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 16)

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[page 16]

[corresponds to page 13 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

[photos of Delaware activities]

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Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 17)

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Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 17)

Description

[page 17]

[corresponds to page 14 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

sports

and

recreation

A significant portion of Delaware

County land is used for recreation.

There are four large reservoirs,

countless fishing streams and

hunting areas, a wild life

preserve, extensive camping

facilities and team sport complexes.

Within the city, there are two

parks: Mingo Park and Blue

Limestone. Both parks have baseball

diamonds. Little League and adult

softball competitions flourish

during the spring and summer.

Delaware also has a very active

soccer education program. The

recently completed Mingo Park

Pool Complex is one of the finest

facilities in the state. The

complex also has an all-purpose

room for recreation and community

activities. There is a nine-hole

par 3 municipal golf course

within the city limits and six

additional golf courses, including

one private country club, in the

immediate area. For tennis

enthusiasts, there are the 12

outdoor courts and four indoor

courts on the Ohio Wesleyan

campus and five outdoor courts

at Hayes High School. Most housing

subdivisions also have tennis

facilities and many have swimming

pools.

Just two miles north of town the

City Waterworks Park provides

for picnicking, fishing and primitive

camping in an area adjacent

to the Olentangy River. The

7,000-acre Delaware State Park

six miles north of town has 214

Class A campsites (164 with

electricity) and a large, free

swimming beach on the Delaware

Reservoir. Launching ramps are

located on three sides of the

lake for boating and water skiing

with marina space for 220 boats

available April through November.

Each summer the Delaware Red

Cross sponsors small crafts boating

instruction at the park. The

5,000-acre wildlife area each

of the lake has 50 stocked ponds and

several hunting areas.

Largest of Delaware County's

reservoirs is one newly-completed

at Alum Creek State Park in the

center of the county. Boating fa-

cilities have been installed and

Class A campsites abound. Two

other nearby lakes, Hoover Reser-

voir and O'Shaughnessy Reservoir,

are maintained by the Columbus

Division of Parks. The Columbus

Municipal Zoo adjoins O'Shaugh-

nessy Reservoir on the Scioto

River in Delaware County. Jack

Nicklaus' famous Muirfield Village

Golf Course, home of the presti-

gious Memorial Tournament, is in

the county near Dublin.

[photos of outdoor scenes and high school basketball team]

14
Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 18)

Title

Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 18)

Description

[page 18]

[corresponds to page 15 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

Close by is another tourist

attraction, the Olentangy Indian

Caverns, a series of inter-

connected limestone caves 55

to 105 feet below ground, once

used by the Wyandot Indians.

An Indian town and frontier

village have been constructed to

add to the enjoyment. Regular

guided cave tours are operated

daily during the summer.

Football and basketball are the

primary spectator sports in and

around Delaware. Ohio Wesleyan

University's Battling Bishops

compete in the Ohio Athletic

Conference; the Hayes High Pacers

play in the Ohio Capital Conference,

and the Buckeye Valley Barons,

Olentangy Braves and Big

Walnut Eagles participate in

the Central Buckeye League.

In Columbus the Ohio State

University football Buckeyes,

always at or near the top of the

NCAA rankings, play home games

in the 86,000-seat horseshoe

stadium. Ohio State's basketball

Bucks play at St. John Arena,

also the site of the Ohio High

School Basketball Championships.

Ohio Wesleyan and Hayes High

School have varsity swimming

teams which use Pfeiffer

Natatorium on the OWU campus.

Both institutions also compete

in basketball, track, tennis, golf,

wrestling and soccer. In addition,

Hayes has a gymnastics team

and Wesleyan fields teams in

lacrosse, sailing and rugby.

The National Football League

Cleveland Browns and Cincinnati

Bengals, the American League

Indians and the National League

Reds are easily accessible via

Interstate 71. The Columbus

Clippers, a fine new Triple A

baseball franchise, play in

refurbished Franklin County Stadium.

In addition to the Grand Circuit

racing and Little Brown Jug

during the Delaware County Fair,

there is harness racing at Scioto

Downs and thoroughbred racing

at Beulah Park, both near

Columbus.

The newly completed Branch Rickey

Physical Education Center on

the Ohio Wesleyan campus includes

a gymnasium and field house.

The center has year-round

facilities for basketball, racquetball,

tennis, running, weightlifting and

swimming.

Snow skiing is less than two

hours away at Bellefontaine,

Mansfield and Butler. The Delaware

Bicycle Club sponsors many

outings throughout the year.

Some Delaware families belong

to the Columbus chapter of the

AYH (American Youth Hostel)

which schedules year-round athletic

activities such as hiking, cross-

country skiing and canoeing on

the Olentangy River.

[photo]

15

Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 19)

Title

Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 19)

Description

[page 19]

[corresponds to page 16 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

industry

Industry in the city has a long

and diversified history from the

grist and sawmills along the

Olentangy River to the modern

Industrial Park and the

planned development of Center

42, an industrial site for

light industry on Ohio Rt. 42

south of Delaware. Today over 50

manufacturers and processors

range from racing sulkies to

school buses.

Industrial development took on

new impetus in 1963 with the

opening of the Industrial Park

on the city's southwestern edge.

Convenience of the Delaware

Municipal Airport, with runways

capable of handling company

jets, was one attraction. The

proximity of Port Columbus

International Airport (one-half hour

driving time) fulfills broader

company transportation needs.

By 1978, the Industrial Park

had as occupants: PPG Industries,

manufacturers of industrial and

automotive coatings; Nippert

Company, copper components;

Trus Joist, roof and floor supports;

Corco, Division of Western Kraft

Paper, corrugated boxes; and

Grumman Flxible Corporation,

buses. About 275 acres remain for

development in the Industrial

Park. Center 42 has approximately

150 acres available for light

manufacturers. Other industries

in Delaware are: Ranco, producing

automatic controls; J.G. Castings

Operations, division of Dresser

Industries, Inc., foundry equipment;

Delo Screw Products; Sunray

Stove Company, Glenwood Range

Division of Caloric Corp. --

A Raytheon Company; Pennwalt

Corporation, chemical specialties;

Correct Manufacturing Corporation,

producers of DIVCO Trucks

and Sky-Workers; and Abex

Corporation -- Denison Division,

hydraulic pumps and motors. Other

companies have chosen to locate

on the highways which lead into

Delaware. ITT North Electric

Company has a research and

engineering center south of

Delaware. Western Auto operates a

regional distribution center off

US 42; the administrative office

of Swan Hose, a division of

Amerace Corporation, is located

on US 23; Bry-Air and Nestle's

are located in nearby Sunbury.

[aerial photo of Industrial Park]

16
Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 20)

Title

Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 20)

Description

[page 20]

[corresponds to unlabeled page 17 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

Equally important to Delaware's

economy are the many locally-

based industries, from Greif

Bros. Corporation, with national

headquarters here and container

manufacturing plants across the

country, to the smaller plants

such as A. C. Miller Company,

manufacturers of broom rakes and

handles, and Whiteside Manufacturing

Company, Inc., producers of

automotive equipment.

An industry unique to Delaware

is World Wide Games, Inc.,

manufacturer of superior quality

hardwood table games and

brain-teasing puzzles.

[photos of companies]
Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 21)

Title

Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 21)

Description

[page 21]

[corresponds to page 18 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

agriculture

Agriculture continues to be

important to the local economy.

Agriculture in Delaware County

yields more than $36 million

yearly. The 1974 Census of

Agriculture reported 1,089 farms in

the county. Trends show fewer

livestock and dairy farms but

more grain farms. In a recent

census, 592 farm operators

reported farming was their principal

occupation. Land in farms was

approximately 196,050 acres with

156,588 acres being cropland.

The biggest local cash crop

is soybeans, which makes up

about one-third of the dollar

total. Dairy products and cattle

together account for about

another one-third. Corn and hogs

are also significant parts of

county agricultural sales.

Agricultural agencies serving

the county include: the Cooperative

Extension Service, the Soil

Conservation Service, the

Agricultural Stabilization and

Conservation Service and the

Farmers Home Administration

through its Mt. Gilead office.

The Delaware Soil and Water

Conservation District has served

the county since 1944. The

Columbus Production Credit and

the Federal Land Bank provide

needed credit loans to farmers

in addition to local credit

institutions. The Delaware County

Farm Bureau Federation is the

major farm organization serving

the county with Granges being

active in some areas. The National

Farmers Organization also has

a county unit.

There are more than 100 4-H

clubs serving Delaware and

Delaware County. (Information

concerning 4-H can be secured

from the Cooperative Extension

Service.) Agricultural educational

programs are conducted by the

vocational agriculture departments

in each of the four high schools

in the county and at the Joint

Vocational School. Each

vocational agriculture department

also has an active FFA (Future

Farmers of America) chapter. Adult

and young farmer programs, as well

as extension educational programs,

are available to farmers and

prospective farmers.

[photo of farm]

18
Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 22)

Title

Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 22)

Description

[page 22]

[corresponds to page 19 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

research

Research operations in the

Delaware area literally reach

from the earth to the stars.

Scientists at the U.S. Department

of Agriculture Laboratories north

of town seek new knowledge in

tree and plant development, insect

and disease research and pest

control, while south of town,

astronomers at Perkins Observatory

scan the skies.

In industrial labs scientists

are working in a variety of

areas from telecommunications

to medical diagnostic agents.

At the ITT North Electric

Company more than 325 scientists

and technicians are involved

in research and development in

telecommunications for government

and industrial use and in

sophisticated digital switching

apparatus for national and

international markets.

The USDA installation near the

Delaware Reservoir now totals

39,000 square feet with 30

labs plus greenhouses. Forest

service specialists work with

insect and disease prevention

and, as northeastern field

office for state and private

forestry, offer guidance to land

managers in Ohio and surrounding

states. Agricultural research

scientists are particularly pursuing

genetic improvement of trees

and plants for urban growing

conditions.

Perkins Observatory, with its

32-inch reflector and radiotelescope,

long has been an important

astronomical research center. It

is operated cooperatively by

Ohio Wesleyan and Ohio State

Universities. Other OWU research

projects, from the social

science of market analysis to

biological studies for environmental

protection, figure prominently

in Delaware city planning.

19
Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 23)

Title

Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 23)

Description

[page 23]

[corresponds to page 20 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

shopping

To the shopper, Delaware

businesses offer a fine selection

of products and services plus

the homey atmosphere that makes

shopping in Delaware a fun

experience.

In addition to the central business

district, there are several

outlying shopping centers and a

large discount department store.

National, regional and local

stores offer area residents a

plentiful supply of both brand

name goods and locally made

crafts. It is rare to see an

empty store room in a Delaware

shopping area.

All major American auto companies

are represented in our service

area. In addition to a great

variety of retail products,

Delaware is served by professional

service companies including

insurance, real estate, plumbing,

heating and cooling, construction

companies and many others.

Local, regional and nationally

owned financial institutions in-

clude a wide range of banks,

savings and loans, and finance

companies. All these businesses

truly make it possible for people

throughout this area to do all

their shopping in the greater

Delaware area.

[photos of downtown]

20
Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 24)

Title

Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 24)

Description

[page 24]

[corresponds to unlabeled page 21 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

motels

and

restaurants

Whether you're looking for gour-

met food or just a "fast" sandwich,

Delaware has a restaurant that

fits the bill. Popular local res-

taurants make eating out a pleas-

ant experience. A unique Delaware

landmark and historical site is

Bun's Restaurant, a five genera-

tion family restaurant in downtown

Delaware. Hotel and motel ac-

commodations include the national

chain, Holiday Inn. Other fine

locally owned motels make Dela-

ware a favorite stop for many

travelers. Meeting and party

rooms for up to 300 people are

available for private and public

gatherings.

[photos]

Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 25)

Title

Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 25)

Description

[page 25]

[corresponds to page 22 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

climate

Delaware enjoys the full range

of seasons, with moderately

hot summers and cold though

usually not severe winters. The

moisture is well distributed

throughout the year, with average

precipitation of about 37

inches, of which about half

comes between May and September.

A typical winter will see

24 inches total snowfall. Past

weather records indicate an

average year will have 101 clear,

118 partly cloudy and 146

cloudy days, with average mean

temperatures of 28 degrees in

January and 73 in July. The

city has an elevation of 860 feet

above sea level.

[photo of little girl and tree]

22
Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 26)

Title

Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 26)

Description

[page 26]

[corresponds to inlet between pages 22 and 23 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

sponsors
Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 27)

Title

Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 27)

Description

[page 27]

[corresponds to page 23 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

SPONSORS

These members of the Delaware Area Chamber of Commerce, who have more than a passing interest in the growth and

development of Delaware and Delaware County, have made this publication possible. By their financial participation as sponsors,

this brochure was produced and made available to you.

ABEX CORPORATION-DENISON DIVISION THE DELAWARE FARMERS EXCHANGE ASSOCIATION

"A Better Neighbor In The Community" Builders Supplies & Hardware

425 S. Sandusky Street 363-1201 141 S. Sandusky St. 363-1301

ADDCO CORPORATION THE DELAWARE GAZETTE

Land Development & Planning Delaware's Oldest Business -- Since 1818

5 W. Winter St. 363-1313 18 E. William St. 363-1161

BANCOHIO FIRST NATIONAL BANK DEL RX PHARMMACY, INC.

Full Service Banking -- Since 1857 Prescription Specialists

34 N. Sandusky St. 363-1245 1 N. Sandusky St. 363-5861

BENNETT-BROWN FUNERAL HOMES DISBENNETT REAL ESTATE COMPANY

Glenn I. Bennett-James M. Brown-John M. Brown Complete Real Estate Services

Delaware Ashley 59 N. Sandusky St. 363-1311

BOB GEORGE PONTIAC, INC. ESHELMAN CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH, INC.

"Our Reputation is Your Protection!" Five Star Dealer...Awarded for Service Excellence

621 S. Sandusky St. 363-1175 256 S. Sandusky St. 369-9611

BRY-AIR, INC. FIDELITY FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN ASSN. OF

Manufacturers Of Complete Environmental Control DELAWARE

Systems 60 N. Sandusky St. 363-1284

Rt. 37, West, Sunbury 965-2974 Georgetowne Branch 30 Troy Rd. 363-1233

BUN'S RESTAURANT AND BAKERY FRIENDLY REALTY

Restaurant-Cocktails-Bakery-Banquets For Your Complete Real Estate Needs

6 W. Winter St. 363-3731 15 N. Liberty Rd., Powell 548-5320

BURRELL INSURANCE, INC. GENERAL CASTING COMPANY

BURRELL INSURANCE, INC. - R.A. TILTON AGENCY Gray Iron Castings - 1 to 30,000 Pounds Per Piece

Delaware - 363-1321; Ashley - 747-2679 Toledo St. 363-1941

CEDO CORPORATION GRAY'S SHOES

Developers Of Georgetowne Centre Family Shoe Store

5 W. Winter St. 363-1313 33 N. Sandusky St. 363-1616

CENTURY 21 - COLE REALTY, INC. GREIF BROS. CORPORATION

Nationwide Referral Service Fibre and Steel Drums, Corrugated Cartons, Multiwall

32 S. Sandusky St. 369-7666 Bags, and Plastic Drums

621 Pennsylvania Ave. 363-1271

CITIZENS FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION GRUMMAN-FLXIBLE CORPORATION

61 N. Sandusky St. - Delaware Manufacturers of City Transit Buses

Home Office - Marysville, Ohio 970 Pittsburgh Drive 369-7671

COLUMBIA GAS OF OHIO, INC. HILBORN INSURANCE

Gas Utility Company Insurance. All Lines - Since 1938

68 N. Sandusky St. 362-7701 46 N. Sandusky St. 369-9641

COLUMBUS & SOUTHERN OHIO ELECTRIC COMPANY HOLIDAY INN - OLIVER'S RESTAURANT

Electric utility Company Lodging-Banquets-Dining Room-Lounge

61 W. William St. 363-1935 351 S. Sandusky St. 363-1262

C.V. PERRY & COMPANY HOLTON TV

Realtors TV Sales & Service

30 Troy Rd. Shopping Center 363-1870 122 W. William St. 362-0561

THE DELAWARE COUNTY BANK

Six Convenient Offices

41 N. Sandusky St. 363-1163

23
Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 28)

Title

Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 28)

Description

[page 28]

[corresponds to page 24 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

HOMEOWNERS' SUPPLY MART RANCO CONTROLS DIVISION

Furnishing Tomorrow's Homes Today Automatic Controls

186 E. William St. 363-1196 555 London Rd. 363-1225

HUMPHRIES MOTOR CITY, INC. SMITHCREST REAL ESTATE

Ford - Dodge - Cars & Trucks Apartments - Homes - Lots

1599 U.S. 23, South 363-1995 345 W. Central Ave. 369-4465

INDEPENDENT PRINT SHOP CO., INC. SMITH'S AUTO SERVICE, INC.

Complete Printing Service Auto Repair, Radiator, Glass, Wheel Alignment, Wheel

9 E. William St. 362-4941 Balance, & Body Shop

117 E. Central Ave. 363-1215

ITT NORTH ELECTRIC COMPANY SULLIVAN'S WESTERN AUTO

Research Center Family Store & Catalog Order Center - Since 1948

P.O. Box 20345, Columbus, Ohio 43220 581-4301 57 N. Sandusky St. 363-3041

MATHIS MOVING & STORAGE TYNES CHEVROLET-CADILLAC, INC.

Agent of Allied Van Lines - "From Across The Street Chevrolet-Cadillac Sales & Service

Or Across The Nation, Mathis Can Handle Your Move" 680 Sunbury Rd. 363-1333

15 Flax St. 363-9292

METZGER-BROWER REALTY COMPANY U.S. STORE - CARDINAL SUPERMARKETS

Real Estate Open 6 In The Morning Til 1 At Night

3 W. Winter St. 369-4478 19 N. Sandusky St. 362-3931

NEW METHOD WESTERN AUTO SUPPLY CO.

Cleaners & Launderers Delaware Distribution Center

190 S. Sandusky St. 363-1917 1675 U.S. Rt. 42 369-4491

THE NIPPERT COMPANY WDLR 1550 RADIO

Commutators, Cold Drawn & Extruded Copper Products Delaware's Only Radio Station

801 Pittsburgh Drive 363-1981 Bowtown Road 363-1107

O'BRIEN OLDS - GMC INC. WHITESIDE MFG. CO., INC.

Oldsmobile & GMC Trucks Manufacturers Of Automotive Equipment

17 W. William St. 363-1288 309 Hayes St. 363-1179

OHIO WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY WILSON'S C.J. OF COURSE

Education & Lecture, Artist, & Sports Events Men's & Women's Clothing

South Sandusky St. 369-4431 26 N. Sandusky St. 363-9322, 363-3901

PEOPLE'S STORE, INC. WORLY PLUMBING SUPPLY, INC.

"Growing With Delaware County" Wholesale Plumbing, Heating, Industrial Supplies

18-20 N. Sandusky St. 363-1925 54 E. Harrison St. 363-1151

PLAZA SQUARE PROPERTIES, INC. WORLY STEEL AND SUPPLY CO.

Developers of Plaza Square Industrial Scrap Is Our Specialty

5 W. Winter St. 363-1313 65 London Rd. 363-9192

PPG INDUSTRIES ZACK DAVIS COMPANY

Coatings & Resins Division Garden Lawn Supplier

760 Pittsburgh Drive 363-9610 U.S. 36 & St. Rt. 521 363-5081

RAILROAD SAVINGS & LOAN CO.

Insured Savings - Home Loans; Since 1885

177 S. Sandusky St. 363-1337

Designed by Ron Bracken; edited

by Mike Welch.

Antique photos by Mike Hoffman, newsphotos by the Delaware

Gazette and Ohio Wesleyan University. Other photos by Rex

Welker, Jim Jackson and David Tull.

24

Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 29)

Title

Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 29)

Description

[page 29]

[corresponds to unlabeled page 25 of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

[map of Ohio with major cities and highways labeled]
Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 30)

Title

Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979) (p. 30)

Description

[page 30]

[corresponds to back cover of Welcome to Delaware Ohio 1979]

[blank]

Dublin Core

Title

Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979)

Subject

Delaware--Delaware County--Ohio--Agriculture--1979
Delaware--Delaware County--Ohio--Business--1979
Delaware--Delaware County--Ohio--Education--1979
Delaware--Delaware County--Ohio--History
Delaware--Delaware County--Ohio--Housing--1979
Delaware--Delaware County--Ohio--Recreation--1979

Description

This book describes Delaware as it was in 1979. The book has a table of contents describing the subject matter of each chapter. The book is designed to encourage people to move to Delaware.

Creator

The Delaware Area Chamber of Commerce, 1979

Date

1979

Rights


http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/NoC-US/1.0/

Format

Book

Language

English

Type

Still Image
Text

Identifier

22221027

Collection

Citation

The Delaware Area Chamber of Commerce, 1979, “Welcome to Delaware, Ohio (1979),” Delaware County Memory, accessed June 19, 2024, http://www.delawarecountymemory.org/items/show/193.

Output Formats